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Metro EGR System; Code 51 EGR valve
Topic Started: Sep 23 2008, 06:53 PM (45,987 Views)
Will
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Victory is mine!!!!

There has been rampant speculation as to the fault that causes the 1.0L G10 Metro engine to puke exhaust valves. No one knows for sure, but the EGR system is a prime suspect, so here we go...

Ok, so this is the EGR system of a Geo Metro. This example comes to us from a Gen 2 with a 1.0L engine and a 5-speed transmission.

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**Make sure you have the data plate under your hood with the hose routing. That way you do not have to remember or mark hoses.**

Part A: EGR valve This is held to the engine with two 10mm long bolts. There is also a gasket. This is the last part of the system you will remove.

Part B: EGR Pressure Transducer (say that 5 times fast). This part contains a pad that looks like a filter. It may need cleaned. It is also easily replaced. It is the first part, along with it's bracket that you will take off.

Parts C and D: EGR Solenoid Vacuum Valves There are two of these. One is red and one is blue. You can tell the difference on your data plate mentioned above because the red one has and extra piece on it. The wires for these come from your main wire bundle that runs through your engine. My wires are red from where I re-taped them during the rebuild. Yours will be black. You will have to remove these to get to the EGR Valve.


Here is my data plate. Yous should most likely be the same if you have the same powertrain as mentioned above.

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This plate will give you where your vacuum lines go. Take it slow when pulling these apart as most of the nipples they go on are plastic.

Here is the removed EGR

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The two larger holes on the left go in and out of the engine. This is where your clogging problem is. This carbon also works it's way into the diaphragm on top All of this carbon must be removed. I used carb and choke cleaner from the auto parts store. When you are spraying it give it hell and don't let up until everything comes out clear.

Next make sure by pushing on the inside that the diaphragm moves smooth and there is no binds at all. After doing this spray it out with cleaner even more. Do this to all the pieces of the system.

Next, put it all back together. Take it slow and use the data plate when putting it back together, afterall they could have been hooked up wrong to begin with.

The last step is to test the system. First start the car and let it warm up until the cooling fan comes on (try not to think about waisted gas).

There is a metal ring around the inside of the diaphragm. Place your finger on this ring and race the engine. You should feel the diaphragm moving slightly when you do so.

Ready for more GEOventures





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Johnny Mullet
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Hi-Tech Redneck

Awesome write-up Will! One trick I use to see if the EGR ports are plugged is to remove the EGR valve and start it up! This will make you hear an exhaust leak which is the flow from the exhaust manifold to the valve. You should have exhaust coming from one port and suction from the other port.

Here is what the EGR port through the head looks like............

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There is also a small section on the exhaust manifold that needs checked. Sometimes you can clean this port with a wire or something, but removing the exhaust manifold will ensure a good cleaning.

The other port through the intake manifold may need cleaned also. Thanks to DoctorBill from automotiveforums.com for this image of the intake port............

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Will
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Victory is mine!!!!

That's cool. I did mine during the rebuild, so I had it apart anyway. I love that idea though, because I was looking for a way to test it on a preventative maintenance basis. Thanks!!
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5 O'Clock Charlie
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Nice write up, and good info !!

Many thanks Will :D
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Ryan
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Ryan

Very thorough Will. I wrote this down as something else to do in a couple months. Really.
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Will
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Victory is mine!!!!

brokestudent
Sep 24 2008, 05:06 PM
Very thorough Will. I wrote this down as something else to do in a couple months. Really.
Thanks. It's always a good idea to keep on top of the EGR. I am going to do mine again by the end of the year using Johnny's tip from above. Some people think it's excessive, but I am figuring once every year or two. Too much just goes wrong with this system and it's a pretty simple thing.
Edited by Will, Sep 24 2008, 05:23 PM.
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Johnny Mullet
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Hi-Tech Redneck

I never understood why, but these little 3 bangers are pretty mean and dirty as far as carbon buildup goes. Mine only had 130,000 miles on it when I did my head rebuild and the carbon in there was unbelievable :-/

SeaFoam does a nice job of keeping it clean :doper
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Will
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Victory is mine!!!!

Mine was really bad too, and it was at 105,000 mi. Bad valves and all. It was a really nasty PO :shit when I got it...
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redneckgeek53
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Redneckgeek53
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Good writeup Will!

And a good tip from Johnny!

When I pulled my three-banger down for rebuild, it was coked up all the way to the base of the throttle body! I mean it looked like a coal mine. The EGR valve wouldn't even move. But the passages in the intake manifold were the worst to clean out because of the bends. It's difficult to find something strong and flexible enough to do the job. Three cans of carb cleaner later and all is back together.

Anyone have any ideas on possible solutions or tools that would make this easier?
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Ryan
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Ryan

I checked out the price on a replacement EGR valve. Damn....
Can of carb cleaner is affordable.


Out of curiousity, I looked up the price of a replacement TBI fuel injector. Well over $200.

And just the other day, the roads being SO rutted down here, my right rear strut gave out (remember, 80K). The notorious thump sound. These cars must be fragile. I'm sure many of you can attest to that.
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z34-5speed
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Formerly "Tech Certified"

Does anyone notice the differance when the EGR is functioning properly and when it's clogged? I never cleaned mine and my header now blocks it off. The cars seems to run alright. I just make sure i seafoam the car once a month to be safe, plus it's fun to do.
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Johnny Mullet
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Hi-Tech Redneck

EGR systems have been blocked off and bypassed by mechanics/owners for years. A good example is the old 2.5L Iron Duke engine used by GM. I truly do not believe blocked EGR ports cause valves to burn on the G10 engine. I believe it's the carbon buildup that does both and Seafoam is your best friend!

An EGR will only cause engine problems when it gets stuck open.
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z34-5speed
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Formerly "Tech Certified"

Here is a pic of why i got the 3tech head/cam package, can you see what is wrong...





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There is a lumina at my local pull apart with the duke in it, i can't believe that thing actually moved.

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1DCGUY
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Don't be a "Richard"

redneckgeek53
Sep 26 2008, 10:49 AM

Anyone have any ideas on possible solutions or tools that would make this easier?
Okay, first post on this board so bear with me,

I have found a very inexpensive tool to do this, head to your local hardware store and pick up two pieces of airline cable, one that is 1/8 and one that is 3/16 in diameter. If you can find some that is coated with plastic that would be best, (approx. 12-15 Inches long) Now take one end of the cable and strip off about 2 inches of the plastic, stick the other end in a cordless drill, and Bingo you've got what I call a metro-rooter. Make sure you put your drill in reverse, or the wire will unravel. Start with the 1/8 and then use the 3/16. The 1/8 should work it's way throught the passage pretty easy and be able to turn the corners in the intake, the 3/16 will take a little more to get thru the passage, but if you work at it, you will get it thru. :thumb

Hope that helps,

Jeff
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Johnny Mullet
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Hi-Tech Redneck

Great 1st post Jeff! Thank you for that information.
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